“WHY? Goes to China: The View from a Private High School” with Yuyan Liu

Episode 47:

Recorded: May 21, 2012.
Originally Broadcast: August 23, 2012

 

In May, 2012, WHY? was invited to China to take a look around, interview who we could find, and take a fresh look at a country that seems to be blamed for all of America’s problems. The result: a half-dozen shows with guests ranging from Chinese college students to four African musicians trying to make it big in Shanghai. What is it like to be an expatriate living in China and do they have more freedom than Chinese nationals? What can we learn from the principal of an elite Chinese private high school? What is the state of environmentalism in the polluted country and how much hold does Confucius’s philosophy have over the country and its politicians? All these questions and more will be answered when WHY? goes to China!

 

Is Chinese education a mindless brainwashing free of critical thinking or is it a modern, pragmatic, well-rounded experience preparing world leaders for the future? Is it a single-monolithic entity treating all citizens alike, or is it more like America where people can choose their own way? Join WHY? and our guest Dr. Yuyan Liu, principal of the Camford Royal School in Beijing, China, as we look at Chinese education from the perspective of the reformer.

Dr. Yuyan Liu, the principal of Camford Royal School, holds a PhD from Cambridge University, where he attended as an Overseas Distinguished Scholar. Dr. Liu is also a high-ranking research fellow of the Royal Society. Over the course of ten years studying, teaching and conducting research at Cambridge, Dr. Liu became intimately familiar with the Cambridge educational philosophy. Upon his return to China, Dr. Liu was inspired to establish a leading advanced study program based upon the Cambridge system. The goal of Dr. Liu’s program is to increase the number of opportunities offered to Camford graduates in terms of acceptances to high quality Western colleges and universities.

WHY?’s trip to China was supported in part by The American Culture Center – Shanghai at the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, through a partnership between USST and the University of North Dakota, supported by the US Department of State.

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